Developing and validating measurements


24-Jul-2017 04:59

“Four reviewers made comments on the manuscript,” he said, “and these are very trusted people.” In retrospect, Bem’s paper had huge, obvious multiple comparisons problems—the editor and his four reviewers just didn’t know what to look for—but back in 2011 we weren’t so good at noticing this sort of thing.At this point, certain earlier work was seen to fit into this larger pattern, that certain methodological flaws in standard statistical practice were not merely isolated mistakes or even patterns of mistakes, but that they could be doing serious damage to the scientific process.2008: Edward Vul, Christine Harris, Piotr Winkielman, and Harold Pashler write a controversial article, “Voodoo correlations in social neuroscience,” arguing not just that some published papers have technical problems but also that these statistical problems are distorting the research field, and that many prominent published claims in the area are not to be trusted. 2008 also saw the start of the blog Neuroskeptic, which started with the usual soft targets (prayer studies, vaccine deniers), then started to criticize science hype (“I’d like to make it clear that I’m not out to criticize the paper itself or the authors . What concerns me is the way in which this study and others like it are reported, and indeed the fact that they are repored as news at all”), but soon moved to larger criticisms of the field.I don’t know that the Neuroskeptic blog per se was such a big deal but it’s symptomatic of a larger shift of science-opinion blogging away from traditional political topics toward internal criticism.Not too many people thought Bem had discovered ESP but there was a general impression that his work was basically solid, and thus this was presented as a concern for pscyhology research.For example, the New York Times reported: The editor of the journal, Charles Judd, a psychologist at the University of Colorado, said the paper went through the journal’s regular review process.Someone sent me this article by psychology professor Susan Fiske, scheduled to appear in the APS Observer, a magazine of the Association for Psychological Science.

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(Correction: Uri emailed to inform me that their paper actually had nothing to do with the subfield of positive psychology and that they intended no such pun.) That same year, Simonsohn also publishes a paper shooting down the dentist-named-Dennis paper, not a major moment in the history of psychology but important to me because that was a paper whose conclusions I’d uncritically accepted when it had come out.

I will be giving any sort of point-by-point refutation of Fiske’s piece, because it’s pretty much all about internal goings-on within the field of psychology (careers, tenure, smear tactics, people trying to protect their labs, public-speaking sponsors, career-stage vulnerability), and I don’t know anything about this, as I’m an outsider to psychology and I’ve seen very little of this sort of thing in statistics or political science.